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REGISTER for the Moral Injury Conference March 18-19 in Berkeley CA here.

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Truth Commission “Testimony Videos”
Truth Commission Trailer
Excerpts from the Emmy-nominated documentary, Soldiers of Conscience

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What is the Truth Commission?
Lists of Testifiers, Commissioners, and Co-Sponsors
Commentary and news coverage, as well as resources on related topics

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Recent Posts:

27
Oct

“How Do We Repair the Souls of Those Returning from Iraq?”

\”How Do We Repair the Souls Of Those Who Come Back from Iraq?\”

by Rita Nakashima Brock and Gabriella Lettini, truth Commission on Conscience in War organizers

“The hidden wounds of war do not heal when left unattended; instead, they may fester for years in depression, homelessness, addiction, and a half-lived existence finished by suicide, which doesn’t end the suffering for those who knew and loved the one who died. Unattended, moral injury will linger for generations. Understanding moral injury is a necessary first step in a much longer societal healing process. We should begin that process today.”

26
Oct

Testifier Camilo Mejia speaks about moral injury at PTSD Symposium

Testifier Camilo Mejia Speaks about Moral Injury at PTSD Symposium\”

Camilo Mejia, Iraq war veteran and conscientious objector, spoke at the PTSD symposium April 23, 2011 in Portland Maine presented by Maine Veterans for Peace. He speaks about PTSD treatment and Moral Injury. He is also the author of Road From ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejia, an Iraq war memoir.

11
Oct

Testifier/expert witness Camilo “Mac” Bica on “The Hidden Wounds of War”

Testifier/expert witness Camilo \”Mac\” Bica on \”The Hidden Wounds of War\”

“In this article I will consider what has been accurately termed the “invisible wounds of war” and three perspectives on healing, e.g., the Clinical Model as set forth in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which views the invisible wounds of war as mental illness; the Normal Response Model as elucidated by Paula J. Caplan, in her new book , When Johnny and Jane Come Marching Home: How All of Us Can Help Veterans, which views a veteran’s “disturbed and lasting emotional response” to war as a normal response to an abnormal situation; and my C ombat Injury Model, where such injuries and veteran readjustment difficulties are regarded as the wounds of war, specifically Combat Related Psychological, Emotional, and Moral (PEM) Injuries. I will begin, however, by providing some background and relate an account of my coming home from war, which though personal, is, I am confident, not unlike many others who shared the experience.”

9
Oct

“On the arts as a resource for healing and reintegration” – Video Interview with Jeremy Begbie

\”On the arts as a resource for healing and reintegration\” Video Interview with Jeremy Begbie

“Part of an interview series with Duke University Divinity School faculty looking at the hidden wounds of war and the Church’s resources that can help those in recovery.
Created for the After the Yellow Ribbon event:

Veterans today commit suicide at the highest rate in our nation’s history, have startling rates of prescription drug and alcohol abuse, and are often thought of as “damaged goods.” Our society must accept the responsibility of acknowledging and confronting the moral fragmentation that our service members suffer as a result of their experiences in war. After the Yellow Ribbon at Duke Divinity School is an opportunity for the ecclesial, academic, and martial communities in particular to listen to and learn from those who endure the burden of doing violence in our name.”

9
Oct

After The Yellow Ribbon Conference At Duke University Divinity School inspired by testifier Logan Mehl-Laituri

After the Yellow Ribbon Conference at Duke Divinity School“How do we promote healing of the hidden wounds of war in our communities and in our lives – what do we do After the Yellow Ribbon?

November 11 & 12, 2011 at Duke University

An emerging student group at Duke Divinity School in Durham, NC is convening the conference After the Yellow Ribbon in order to develop tools that church, military and academic communities can use in order to approach service members and veterans as human beings, and to understand and heal the unseen wounds of war (including PTSD and moral injury). After the Yellow Ribbon is an opportunity for these communities in particular to listen to and learn from those who endure the burden of doing violence in our name.

Veterans today suffer from the highest rate of suicide in our nation’s history, have startlingly high rates of prescription drug and alcohol abuse, and are often thought of as “damaged goods.” Our society must accept the responsibility of acknowledging and confronting the moral fragmentation that our service members suffer as a result of their experiences in war. We are Milites Christi, a newly forming Duke University student group. We invite practitioners of all disciplines, from music and the arts to theology and mental health, to respond to the challenge presented by the plight of soldiers and veterans in our midst. We want to work together to improve our efforts at prevention and reconstitution, and overcome this tragic epidemic.”